How to Make Delicious Chal-kumro Bora with an Interesting twist #255

Chal kumro bora / Ash gourd fritter is the best way to consume this otherwise boring vegetable with respect to taste. This can make a great combo with plain rice and lentil soup (dal). This recipe has both vegan/vegetarian and non-vegetarian alternatives.

How to make Rosh Bora – Bengal’s lost delicacies #254

Rosh means syrup and Bora means fritter in Bengali. Basically Rosh Bora kind of a lentil fritter that is dipped into sugar syrup. It may look similar to gulab jamun, yet the flavor and texture is poles apart from that of gulab jamun. This recipe is also vegan and vegetarian friendly.

How to make Restaurant-style Paneer Butter Masala but HEALTHIER #253

Paneer Butter Masala is a North Indian cuisine made from Cottage Cheese (also known as Paneer in India) and a smooth and creamy, moderately spicy gravy. This is definitely a delight for the vegetarians. It tastes amazing with any sort of Indian bread like roti, chapati, naan, paratha and so on.

How to make Indian Style Egg fried Rice #252

Egg fried rice is one of the most common dishes of Chinese take-away. Egg fried rice is often made with left over rice in an Asian household. At my home, my mom always makes it with freshly cooked rice and its fancy enough to serve to guests as well along with a curry.

My mom’s approach has made it more inclined towards the Indian flavor profile- even though it’s definitely not spicy.

Making Rosogolla/Rasgulla is easier than you thought #225

Rosogolla or Rasgulla is one of the most iconic Bengali sweets. While you can find them so easily in any corner of Bengal, it is equally hard to get them anywhere else in India in affordable price.

These sweets are like white balls made of cottage cheese, dipped in light sugar syrup. We attempted to make rosogolla at home a couple of times and now I am sharing the recipe for those who wanna try!

How to make Chana Masala/Chickpea Curry #221

Chana masala is one of the popular curry made from chickpea. This can be eaten with plain rice or any sort of Indian bread such as chapati, poori, naan etc.

Chana masala can be dry or semi-dry. It’s moderately spicy with flavors of coriander and cumin seeds with a tangy hint. It can be served both as a main course or a tea-time snack. I am sharing my mom’s take on the recipe.